Analysis of measurement changes in pelvic incidence according to pelvic rotation using a three-dimensional model

Ki Young Lee, Jung Hee Lee, Sang Kyu Im, Won Young Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Pelvic incidence (PI) is used as a key parameter in surgical correction of adult spinal deformity (ASD). However, reflecting the exact center or inclination of the three-dimensional anatomical structures on the two-dimensional (2D) sagittal radiographs is limited, resulting in measurement errors. Therefore, we evaluated whether there is a change in PI measurement according to the actual rotation of the pelvis, and conducted a study on a more accurate method for PI measurement using 2D sagittal radiographs. Methods: From 2014 to 2015, the data of 30 patients who visited our outpatient clinic were analyzed retrospectively. CT scans including those of the lower lumbar spine, pelvis, and both femurs in the DICOM format were imported to Mimics Research 17.0 (Materialise NV, Belgium), SolidWorks (Dassault systems, France), and AutoCAD 2014 (AUTODESK, US). The changes in PI according to vertical and horizontal pelvic rotations were evaluated. Results: The average PIs according to the horizontal pelvic rotations measured on AutoCAD with 0°, 5°, 10°, 15°, 20°, 25°, 30°, 35°, and 40° were 48.8°, 48.7°, 48.3°, 47.8°, 46.9°, 45.6°, 44.0°, 42.2°, and 39.9°, respectively. The PI with an acceptable error of 6° on radiographs was 35° in the horizontal pelvic rotation. The average PIs according to the vertical pelvic rotations measured on AutoCAD with 0°, 5°, 10°, 15°, 20°, 25°, 30°, 35°, and 40° were 48.8°, 49.0°, 49.5°, 50.2°, 51.3°, 52.7°, 54.4°, 56.6°, and 59.4°, respectively. The PI with an acceptable error of 6° on radiographs was 30° in the vertical pelvic rotation. Conclusions: This study revealed that the PI value could differ from the actual anatomical value due to the horizontal and vertical rotation of the pelvis while acquiring the radiograph. Regarding whole-spine lateral radiographs, errors in PI measurement may occur due to pelvic rotation or nonvertical projection of X-rays. In the standing pelvic lateral radiographs, ensuring superposition of the femoral heads at the center and obtaining the straight sacral endplate by referring to CT or magnetic resonance imaging would be a more accurate measurement method to define PI.

Original languageEnglish
Article number110
JournalBMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2022

Keywords

  • Pelvic incidence
  • Pelvis
  • Rotation

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