Transplantation of cyclic stretched fibroblasts accelerates the wound-healing process in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice

Eunkyung Lee, Do Yeon Kim, Eunkyung Chung, Eun Ah Lee, Ki Sook Park, Youngsook Son

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mechanical stimulation is a known modulator of survival and proliferation for many cells, including endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. In this study, we found that mechanical strain prevents apoptosis and increases the adhesive ability of dermal fibroblasts in vitro and thus confers the survival advantage in vivo after transplantation of fibroblasts into the full-thickness wound of diabetic mice. Cyclic stretch at a frequency of 0.5 Hz and maximum elongation of 20% stimulates cellular survival mediated by the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs), and the serine/threonine kinase Akt (AKT). Stretching of the fibroblasts increases the synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins and the formation of denser focal adhesion structures, both of which are required for fibroblast adhesion. The stretched fibroblasts also upregulate the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α), which enhanced wound healing in vivo. Indeed, preconditioning with mechanical stretch allows better survival of the transplanted fibroblasts, when compared to unstretched control cells, in the wound environment of mice with streptozotocin-induced diabetes and thus accelerates the wound-healing process in these mice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)285-301
Number of pages17
JournalCell Transplantation
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2014

Keywords

  • Angiogenesis
  • Cell survival
  • Cyclic stretch
  • Mechanical stimulus
  • Wound healing

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